Bargello Museum

Museum
Bargello Museum Looking for the best exhibits, galleries, & events at Bargello Museum in Florence? Check out Party Earth for schedules, photos, videos & more for this great museum! Florence Italy 43.770509 11.257864
4.2 2
Bargello Museum - Museum in Florence.
Collapse map / See photo gallery
+
Add to list
Liked By:
  • Lucas
  • Adriana
  • Jonah
  • Emma

INFO Once a 13th century palace that housed the city’s Chief Magistrate, the Bargello National Museum is one of the oldest public buildings in Florence. The palace, which also goes by the name of Palazzo del Popolo... ... read more

Bargello Museum Videos

Florence Dance Company Dance At the Bargello Museum to Art Of Adi Da Samraj
0:000:00
Florence Dance Company Dance At the Bargello Museum to Art Of Adi Da Samraj
980 views
Bargello Museum
297 views
2005 - Donatello's Attis restored at the Bargello Museum (2)
712 views
2009_DONATELLOS DAVID RESTORED AT THE BARGELLO MUSEUM_ENG
1,675 views
Bargello Museum performance of Quattro Maggiore
2,214 views

Bargello Museum Information

Once a 13th century palace that housed the city’s Chief Magistrate, the Bargello National Museum is one of the oldest public buildings in Florence.

The palace, which also goes by the name of Palazzo del Popolo, was converted into a police headquarters and prison in the 18th century before becoming a museum for Gothic and Renaissance art in 1865.

The museum features works by some of the most celebrated Italian masters like Michelangelo, Brunelleschi, and Bernini, as well as a series of bronze statues from the Medici family’s private collection. The site famously houses Donatello’s first David statue.

Events at Bargello National Museum include classical concerts, theater performances, and dance festivals held each summer in the building’s central courtyard.

Bargello Museum User Reviews

Average rating:
Sculptural Bliss
Kendyll B. Mar 5, 2013
If you recently visited the well-known Uffizi or Accademia you may, perhaps, have noticed the distinct lack of Quattrocento and Cinquecento sculpture (otherwise known as hailing from the 15th and 16th century). While your experience with regard to painting at the aforementioned museums will no doubt be fulfilling, even life-changing, so too, will your time viewing marble wonders at the Bargello. As the oldest public building in Florentine history, this grand edifice was once the center of the Florence city council (prior to the creation of the Palazzo Vecchio). Thus, it is filled with a number of quintessentially Renaissance pieces. Upon entering the courtyard and climbing the steps to the upper story, you will find a number of sculptures from the 14th and 15th centuries. Examples include Donatello's David (which served as a predecessor to Michelangelo's more famous work) and two of the original panels from the competition held for the designing of the baptistry's Gates of Paradise (one panel by Brunelleschi who would later go on to design the dome of Florence's duomo and the other by winning contestant Ghiberti). In returning to the ground floor and entering the display area, you will have the chance to witness lesser known 16th century pieces by Michelangelo, Bandinelli and Cellini. In fact, Michelangelo's first commissioned sculpture, the Bacchus, resides here. If you have time to spare, you may want to bring a sketch book with as there is seating in the courtyard. On a nice day, it is quite relaxing to lounge in the square and people watch (though you will likely only see 5-10 visitors at a time) or contemplate the art history around you. The Bargello is definitely a must for any tourist looking to enrich their knowledge of, and enhance their appreciation for, Florentine art of centuries past.
The Uffizi's less populated little sister
Tara R. Dec 9, 2012
Museum person or no, the Bargello Museum is a must on any trip to Florence. There’s the collection—which holds its own against the Accademia and the Uffizi—and then there’s the history of the building, which has gone from palace to prison to public house (that charges an entry fee, of course). Even if hearing the names Bernini and Bandinelli doesn’t mean much, the building is worth a visit for its cultural and historical significant. The sculptures and paintings are impressive, of course, but the courtyard is my favorite part of the museum—a lovely open air space that reminds me of the Capulet house in Zeffirelli’s film. And unlike the Uffizi and the Accademia, you probably won’t have to wait that long in line…if there even is one.
Load more comments
Not sure where to go this weekend in Florence? Sign up for our weekly email and get updates on the coolest things to do!

Book Now and Save at Hotels.com

Are we missing a venue or event?
Find your scene